Gary Moller: [DipPhEd PGDipRehab PGDipSportMed(Otago)FCE Certified, Kordel's and Nutra-Life Certified Natural Health Consultant]. ICL Laboratories registered Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis and Medical Nutrition Consultant.

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Tuesday, December 05, 2006

Training advice for running Rotorua Marathon

Gary,
I've done quite a few Rotoruas & intend doing the 2007 also.
BUT from 12 Feb to 9 Mar I'll be away on extended overseas trip (skiing).Great fun but lttle opportunity for safe running - from previous experience won't manage more than 1 to 2 hours per week - weather and underfoot snow limited.
I should be up to the 3 hour ++ runs by beginning of Feb.What should I try immediately on my return?
Some background :age 65 in March,Last year did 4.35 with not much training.Expect a bit under 4:30 this time if I don't bend myself skiing!Skiing in Colorado so some beneficial altitude effects anticipated - staying & skiing @ 9000ft & above.
Regards "Peter"
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Gary Moller comments:
Peter, with your years of running behind you, and with a few months to go upon your return, you should have no problems with being ready to run Rotorua.
The altitude will help with keeping the heart and circulation going. Why not try x-country skiing every 2nd and 3rd day? There is good x-country skiing where you are going. This will really work the legs and the lungs.
If possible, you should still try to do a regular jog, even if it is very short at the end of the day. While skiing is very good conditioning, it still is not running.
Upon your return, restrain the tempatation to launch right into the running. Give yourself time to adapt to the new time zone and for the leg muscles to get used to running again. Run trails to start with and bear in mind that your cardiovascular fitness from all that time at altitude may be a tad ahead of the legs. So take care not to injure the legs during the first few weeks.
Finally, you do not need to run longer than 3 hours in training. If you can run 3 hrs nice and steady - don't go longer or faster - concentrate on the shorter runs during the week and do one or two of them faster and enter a few 5-10km races.
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