Gary Moller: [DipPhEd PGDipRehab PGDipSportMed(Otago)FCE Certified, Kordel's and Nutra-Life Certified Natural Health Consultant]. ICL Laboratories registered Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis and Medical Nutrition Consultant.

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Saturday, February 09, 2013

Advice for a tired Ultra Marathon Runner

Hi Gary, I'm training for an ultra-marathon (89k) and am looking for something to help with recovery/nutrition. I have to do 2 long runs over the weekend (this weekend it will be 1h50 and 3h15 in duration) and are struggling on the second run at the moment. Any advice?
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Gary:
Yes, cut out the first run and the 2nd run will then be much easier to complete.

Or, if you are not willing to do that try these:

  • Get a thorough massage, from the wife, on the legs an hour or so after the first run.  Make this more of a "flushing" massage than deep tissue.
  • Have a long warm bath with about one cup of Epsom Salts and two dessertspoons of bicarbonate of soda dissolved in it.  Get the wife to give you a chilled beer and a shoulder rub while relaxing in the bath.
  • Have a Super Smoothie within the hour of finishing the first run.  Throw in a half can of coconut cream and plenty of dark berries, banana and any other fruit that grabs you.
  • Have some Balance Recovery Stack before, during and after the first run.  Ensure you are fully hydrated within about 6 hours of finishing (best done by before and after weigh-ins).
  • Eat lots and lots of food over the 24 hours following the first run.  Mostly carbs but ensure there is plenty of protein and fat as well.  Much of the tired, heavy feeling the day after a run is due to depletion of muscle glycogen.  Replenish this with carbs.  
  • Stretch gently every few hours.
  • Get the wife to do all the work: Laze around the house for the rest of the day and go to bed early and lie in for as long as you can.
This advice is relevant for anybody doing extreme exercise of any kind, such as preparing for events such as the annual Oxfam 100km walk.  Not just runners.

There is much more that can be done, such as the use of various supplements to reduce oxidative stress and mineral supplementation but these are longterm strategies and best done by way of a one on one consultation because everybody is different.  This can be by way of Skype or in person.

Of course, it goes without saying that preparation for extreme endurance events of any kind needs to begin at least a year before.  There is never enough time to get ready for these events, no matter how long one has!



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