Gary Moller: [DipPhEd PGDipRehab PGDipSportMed(Otago)FCE Certified, Kordel's and Nutra-Life Certified Natural Health Consultant]. ICL Laboratories registered Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis and Medical Nutrition Consultant.

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Friday, February 08, 2013

Low fat, low salt, high carb diets discredited at last!

Ever wondered why there has been an uncanny correlation between the obesity, thyroid and diabetes epidemics and world-wide health campaigns of the last 30 years?

If it has the "Heart Tick" or says "99% fat-free" don't eat it.  

If you want to stay healthy, that is.

Raisin Hell: A day late and a dollar short? - Australia’s peak ...: The week before last the Heart Foundation, Cancer Council and Diabetes Australia declared war on sugar. But before you break out the party p...

Time to get rid of that Heart Tick Olivani and get back to the silvertop full cream milk (Since I ditched the heart-healthy margarines several years ago and switched to raw full-cream milk, my body fat has dropped from 15-17% to less than 10% today with a corresponding increase in muscle and bone).


Study raises questions about dietary fats and heart disease guidance

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 10:38
Dietary advice about fats and the risk of heart disease is called into question on bmj.com today as a clinical trial shows that replacing saturated animal fats with omega-6 polyunsaturated vegetable fats is linked to an increased risk of death among patients with heart disease.
The researchers say their findings could have important implications for worldwide dietary recommendations.



Back To The Future: Resurrected Data From 1960s Trial Might Impact Contemporary Dietary Fat Debate


In an exceedingly strange turn of events, data from a clinical trial dating from the 1960s, long thought to be lost, has now been resurrected and may contribute important new information to the very contemporary controversy over recommendations about dietary fat composition.
Delorean DMC-12The American Heart Association has long urged people to increase their consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including omega 6 PUFAs, and reduce their consumption of  saturated fatty acids. The recommendations are based on the simple observation that PUFAs lower total and LDL cholesterol while SFAs have the opposite effect. However, the cardiovascular effects of substituting PUFAs for SFAs have never been tested in randomized, well-controlled clinical trials, and a growing proportion of experts now suspect that simple changes in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol may not tell the whole story.

"Lost data?"  Give me a break folks!  More like we have been lied to for decades at the cost of ill-health and premature death affecting millions of people.  I wonder who profited from the low fat-high sugar dictums that have completely dominated public health messages and even the education of just about every nutritionist educated over the last 30 years?  Think statins, blood pressure, thyroid and diabetes drugs.  Jenny Craig, gastric bypass surgery.  The depression industry.  The food industry (the more demand and the more processing of cheap grains, such as corn, canola and soy, the bigger the returns).  Hmm... Quite a list if you ask me!

At the same time the handful of health professional who questioned the low fat party line were ridiculed, ostracised and labelled as misguided quacks.

By the way, I'll bet you have not heard the sensational news yet that the low salt health advice has turned out to be equally misguided. In fact a low salt diet may increase your risk of heart failure!  Since bumping up my personal intake of Himalyan Sea Salt several years ago, my blood pressure has become strangely stable at about 120/80.

Note the date of the article that follows....


New Study Finds No Connection between Salt and Heart Disease

Link between salt consumption and heart disease challenged.
By Ewen Callaway of Nature magazine July 6, 2011
A controversial new study is questioning the oft-repeated connection between the consumption of too much salt and the development of cardiovascular disease. The meta-analysis, published online today in the American Journal of Hypertension1, examined the results of seven clinical studies and found no solid proof that reducing salt consumption prevents heart conditions.

It will be interesting to see how much publicity these two new astounding findings receive in mainstream media and how quickly agencies, like the Heart and Cancer Foundations, change their messages.

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